Festivals of Nepal



Dashain an introduction

Dashain is the 15 day long national religious festival of Nepal. It is the longest and the most auspicious festival in the Nepalese annual calendar, celebrated by Nepalese people throughout the globe. It is not only the longest festival of the country but is also the one which is most anticipated. The festival falls around October-November, starting from the bright lunar fortnight and ending on the day of full moon. Amidst the 15 days the most important days are the 1st, 7th, 8th, 9th and the 10th. The fifteen days of celebration occur during the bright lunar fortnight ending on the day of the full moon. Dasain is also popularly referred to as Badadashain, Dashera, Vijaya Dashami etc. Throughout the country the goddess mother is worshiped in all her manifestations. This festival is also known for its emphasis on the family gatherings, as well as on a renewal of community ties. People return from all parts of the world, as well as different parts of the country, to celebrate together. All government offices, educational institutions and other offices remain closed during prime days of the festival.Dashain is the 15 day long national religious festival of Nepal. It is the longest and the most auspicious festival in the Nepalese annual calendar, celebrated by Nepalese people throughout the globe. It is not only the longest festival of the country but is also the one which is most anticipated. The festival falls around October-November, starting from the bright lunar fortnight and ending on the day of full moon. Amidst the 15 days the most important days are the 1st, 7th, 8th, 9th and the 10th. The fifteen days of celebration occur during the bright lunar fortnight ending on the day of the full moon. Dasain is also popularly referred to as Badadashain, Dashera, Vijaya Dashami etc. Throughout the country the goddess mother is worshiped in all her manifestations. This festival is also known for its emphasis on the family gatherings, as well as on a renewal of community ties. People return from all parts of the world, as well as different parts of the country, to celebrate together. All government offices, educational institutions and other offices remain closed during prime days of the festival.

To truly enjoy and understand the Nepali culture, the festival time is most opportune one. Fishtail Tours & Travel therefore, brings you special festival tour program who want to understand the real culture & festival of Nepal.To truly enjoy and understand the Nepali culture, the festival time is most opportune one. Fishtail Tours & Travel therefore, brings you special festival tour program who want to understand the real culture & festival of Nepal.

The festival in the year 2014 falls from 25th September to 8th October. This is the most pleasant season with mild temperature and usually clear and sunny days.

Tihar Festival: an Introduction


This Hindu festival is also known as the "Festival of Lights." Candles, lanterns and colored tinsel are used to decorate homes over a three day period. The first day is the main festival of light where people welcome the goddess of wealth, Laxmi, into their homes for good fortune in the coming year. The following day is for self blessing wishing towards a healthy and happy for year. On the final day Sisters make offerings to their brothers. Tihar is also known as Diwali in terai region of Nepal. It is one of the greatest celebrations in Nepal throughout the country. It is a five-day-long Hindu festival celebrated in Nepal which comes soon after Dashain.

In Nepal all hindu ethnic groups celebrate this festival with there own little variation . Among the Newars, it is known as Swanti. The festival is celebrated from Trayodashi of Kartik Krishna to Katrik Shukla Dwitiya every year. Tihar in general signifies the festival of lights, where diyas are lit both inside and outside the houses to make it illuminate at night. The five-day festival is considered to be of great importance as it shows reverence to not just the humans and the Gods, but also to the animals like crow, cow and dog, who maintain an intense relationship with the humans. People make patterns on the floor of living rooms or courtyards using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, colored sand or flower petals outside of their house, called "Rangoli" which is meant to be sacred welcoming areas for the Hindu deities.


Kag Tihar (Crow's Festival)

The first day of the festival is called Kag Tihar or Kag Puja (worship of the crows). The crows are worshiped by offerings of sweets and dishes on the roof of the houses or squires on the neighbourhoods. The cawing of the crows symbolizes sadness and grief in the Hindu mythology, so the devotees offer the crows food to avert grief and deaths in their homes. Tihar in Nepal represent the divine attachment between Human and other animals. Crow is also worshiped for its unique mythical role in bringing news.


Kukur Tihar (Dog's Festival)

The second day is called Kukur Tihar or Kukur Puja (worship of the dogs). It is also called as Khicha Puja by the Newars. Dog, which is believed to be messenger of Lord Yamaraj, the God of death, is worshiped once a year on this day. People offer garlands, tika and delicious food to the dogs, and acknowledge the cherished relationship between humans and the dogs. This day is also observed as Narka Chaturdashi. All the dogs at homes, in streets or neighbourhood look special that day.


Gai Tihar and Laxmi Puja (Worshiping of Cows, Oxen and Wealth)

Garlands of marigold flower are specially used for the decoration in all five days. Houses, offices and commercial complexes are decorated with garlands in the morning of Laxmi Puja. The morning of third day is Gai Tihar (worship of the cow). In Hinduism, cow signifies prosperity and wealth. In ancient times people benefitted a lot from the cow. Its milk, dung even urine was used for different purposes like purification. Thus on this day people show their gratefulness to the cow by garlanding and feeding the cow with the best grass. Houses are cleaned and the doorways and windows are decorated with garlands made of marigolds and chrysanthemums. In the evening Laxmi, the goddess of wealth is thanked for all the benefits that were bestowed on the families by lighting oil lamps or candles on doorways and windows to welcome prosperity and well being. At night the girls enjoy dancing and visiting all the houses of the neighborhood with musical instruments singing and dancing known as Bhailo all night long collecting money as tip from houses and share the bounty amongst themselves. From the third day onwards tihar is celebrated by playing Deusi and Bhailo along with light and fireworks. Deusi is mostly sung by the boys while the Bhailo is sung by the girls. Nowadays Social workers and politician along with, young and children visit local homes to sing these songs, and in return the home owners give them money, fruit and Selroti (a special type of Nepali bread made by rice flour and sugar).Garlands of marigold flower are specially used for the decoration in all five days. Houses, offices and commercial complexes are decorated with garlands in the morning of Laxmi Puja. The morning of third day is Gai Tihar (worship of the cow). In Hinduism, cow signifies prosperity and wealth. In ancient times people benefitted a lot from the cow. Its milk, dung even urine was used for different purposes like purification. Thus on this day people show their gratefulness to the cow by garlanding and feeding the cow with the best grass. Houses are cleaned and the doorways and windows are decorated with garlands made of marigolds and chrysanthemums. In the evening Laxmi, the goddess of wealth is thanked for all the benefits that were bestowed on the families by lighting oil lamps or candles on doorways and windows to welcome prosperity and well being. At night the girls enjoy dancing and visiting all the houses of the neighborhood with musical instruments singing and dancing known as Bhailo all night long collecting money as tip from houses and share the bounty amongst themselves. From the third day onwards tihar is celebrated by playing Deusi and Bhailo along with light and fireworks. Deusi is mostly sung by the boys while the Bhailo is sung by the girls. Nowadays Social workers and politician along with, young and children visit local homes to sing these songs, and in return the home owners give them money, fruit and Selroti (a special type of Nepali bread made by rice flour and sugar).


Gobardhan Puja and Mha Puja

On the fourth day of Tihar, there are three different known pujas, depending on the people's specific cultural background. Most perform Goru Tihar or Goru Puja (worship of the oxen). People who follow Vaishnavism perform Govardhan Puja, which is worship towards goverdhan mountain. Cowdung is taken as representative of the mountain and is worshiped . The Newar community on the night of this day do Mha Puja (worship of self).This period is also the beginning of Nepal Sambat(newari new year ) especially commemorated by Newars, it ensures prosperity for the new year. The fifth and last day of Tihar is Bhai Tika, where sisters put tika on the foreheads of brothers, to ensure long life, and thank them for the protection they give.It is believed that Yamraj, the God of Death visited his sister Yamuna on this particular day.where she applied the auspicious tika on his forehead, garlanded him and fed him with special dishes. Together, they ate the sweets, talked and enjoyed themselves to their heart's content. While parting Yamraj gave her a special gift as a token of his love and in return Yami also gave him a lovely gift which she had made with her own hands. That day Yamraj announced that anyone who receives tilak from his sister will never be thrown to death on that day . A special garland is made for the brothers out of a flower that wilts only after a couple of months, symbolizing the sister's prayer for her brother's long life. Brothers sit on a floor while sisters perform their puja. The puja follows a traditional ritual in which sisters circle brothers dripping oil on the floor from a copper pitcher applying oil in brother's hair, then 7 color tika is applied on brothers forehead . Then brothers give tika to sisters in the same fashion along with exchange of gifts . This is practiced regardless of whether brother is younger or elder to the sister. Those without a sister or brother join relatives or friends for tika. This festival brings close relationship between brothers and sisters. To truly enjoy and understand the Nepali culture, the festival time is most opportune one. Fishtail Tours & Travel therefore, brings you special festival tour program who want to understand the real culture & festival of NepalOn the fourth day of Tihar, there are three different known pujas, depending on the people's specific cultural background. Most perform Goru Tihar or Goru Puja (worship of the oxen). People who follow Vaishnavism perform Govardhan Puja, which is worship towards goverdhan mountain. Cowdung is taken as representative of the mountain and is worshiped . The Newar community on the night of this day do Mha Puja (worship of self).This period is also the beginning of Nepal Sambat(newari new year ) especially commemorated by Newars, it ensures prosperity for the new year. The fifth and last day of Tihar is Bhai Tika, where sisters put tika on the foreheads of brothers, to ensure long life, and thank them for the protection they give.It is believed that Yamraj, the God of Death visited his sister Yamuna on this particular day.where she applied the auspicious tika on his forehead, garlanded him and fed him with special dishes. Together, they ate the sweets, talked and enjoyed themselves to their heart's content. While parting Yamraj gave her a special gift as a token of his love and in return Yami also gave him a lovely gift which she had made with her own hands. That day Yamraj announced that anyone who receives tilak from his sister will never be thrown to death on that day . A special garland is made for the brothers out of a flower that wilts only after a couple of months, symbolizing the sister's prayer for her brother's long life. Brothers sit on a floor while sisters perform their puja. The puja follows a traditional ritual in which sisters circle brothers dripping oil on the floor from a copper pitcher applying oil in brother's hair, then 7 color tika is applied on brothers forehead . Then brothers give tika to sisters in the same fashion along with exchange of gifts . This is practiced regardless of whether brother is younger or elder to the sister. Those without a sister or brother join relatives or friends for tika. This festival brings close relationship between brothers and sisters. To truly enjoy and understand the Nepali culture, the festival time is most opportune one. Fishtail Tours & Travel therefore, brings you special festival tour program who want to understand the real culture & festival of Nepal

The Tihar festival in the year 2014 falls from 21st to 25th October. This is the most pleasant season with mild temperature and usually clear and sunny days.


Chhath is an ancient Hindu festival and only Vedic Festival dedicated to the Hindu Sun God, Surya and Chhathi Maiya (ancient Vedic Goddess Usha). The Chhath Puja is performed in order to thank Surya for sustaining life on earth and to request the granting of certain wishes.

The Sun, considered the god of energy and of the life-force, is worshiped during the Chhath festival to promote well-being, prosperity and progress. In Hinduism, Sun worship is believed to help cure a variety of diseases, including leprosy, and helps ensure the longevity and prosperity of family members, friends, and elders. The rituals of the festival are rigorous and are observed over a period of four days. They include holy bathing, fasting and abstaining from drinking water (Vratta), standing in water for long periods of time, and offering prashad (prayer offerings) and arghya to the setting and rising sun.

The ancient Hindu festival of Holi falls on late February or on early March. Named after the mythical demoness Holika, it is a day when the feast of colors is celebrated. Fagu is another name for Holi where Fagu means the sacred red powder and Purnima is the full moon day, on which the festival ends. People can be seen wandering through the streets either on foot or on some vehicle, with a variety of colors smeared over them.The ancient Hindu festival of Holi falls on late February or on early March. Named after the mythical demoness Holika, it is a day when the feast of colors is celebrated. Fagu is another name for Holi where Fagu means the sacred red powder and Purnima is the full moon day, on which the festival ends. People can be seen wandering through the streets either on foot or on some vehicle, with a variety of colors smeared over them.


Families and friends get together and celebrate the occasion with a lot of merry making. This springtime celebration is also an outburst of youthful exuberance in which throwing colors and water balloons (lolas) on passer- by is acceptable. But, the Indian community, that is, the Marwari class who have settled down in Nepal for centuries and the people of Terai celebrate it a day later with more pomp and ceremony.Families and friends get together and celebrate the occasion with a lot of merry making. This springtime celebration is also an outburst of youthful exuberance in which throwing colors and water balloons (lolas) on passer- by is acceptable. But, the Indian community, that is, the Marwari class who have settled down in Nepal for centuries and the people of Terai celebrate it a day later with more pomp and ceremony.


The days prior to the last don't have a lot happening except, the installation of the ceremonial pole called "chir', on the first day. It's a bamboo pole, fringed with strips of cloth representing good luck charms. It is said to symbolize the tree on which lord Krishna hung the milkmaids' garments while they were bathing, unseen as they thought, in the Jamuna River of northern India. As the pole is put up in the street at Basantapur, the festivities and worship commences for the week.The days prior to the last don't have a lot happening except, the installation of the ceremonial pole called "chir', on the first day. It's a bamboo pole, fringed with strips of cloth representing good luck charms. It is said to symbolize the tree on which lord Krishna hung the milkmaids' garments while they were bathing, unseen as they thought, in the Jamuna River of northern India. As the pole is put up in the street at Basantapur, the festivities and worship commences for the week.

The ancient Hindu festival of Holi falls on late February or on early March. Named after the mythical demoness Holika, it is a day when the feast of colors is celebrated. Fagu is another name for Holi where Fagu means the sacred red powder and Purnima is the full moon day, on which the festival ends. People can be seen wandering through the streets either on foot or on some vehicle, with a variety of colors smeared over them.The ancient Hindu festival of Holi falls on late February or on early March. Named after the mythical demoness Holika, it is a day when the feast of colors is celebrated. Fagu is another name for Holi where Fagu means the sacred red powder and Purnima is the full moon day, on which the festival ends. People can be seen wandering through the streets either on foot or on some vehicle, with a variety of colors smeared over them.


Families and friends get together and celebrate the occasion with a lot of merry making. This springtime celebration is also an outburst of youthful exuberance in which throwing colors and water balloons (lolas) on passer- by is acceptable. But, the Indian community, that is, the Marwari class who have settled down in Nepal for centuries and the people of Terai celebrate it a day later with more pomp and ceremony.Families and friends get together and celebrate the occasion with a lot of merry making. This springtime celebration is also an outburst of youthful exuberance in which throwing colors and water balloons (lolas) on passer- by is acceptable. But, the Indian community, that is, the Marwari class who have settled down in Nepal for centuries and the people of Terai celebrate it a day later with more pomp and ceremony.


The days prior to the last don't have a lot happening except, the installation of the ceremonial pole called "chir', on the first day. It's a bamboo pole, fringed with strips of cloth representing good luck charms. It is said to symbolize the tree on which lord Krishna hung the milkmaids' garments while they were bathing, unseen as they thought, in the Jamuna River of northern India. As the pole is put up in the street at Basantapur, the festivities and worship commences for the week.The days prior to the last don't have a lot happening except, the installation of the ceremonial pole called "chir', on the first day. It's a bamboo pole, fringed with strips of cloth representing good luck charms. It is said to symbolize the tree on which lord Krishna hung the milkmaids' garments while they were bathing, unseen as they thought, in the Jamuna River of northern India. As the pole is put up in the street at Basantapur, the festivities and worship commences for the week.

The festival is celebrated on the day of Lord Buddha, who was born in Lumbini. On the full moon day of Baisakh (approximately May), Buddha's birth, enlightenment and salvation are applauded both in and outside the Kathmandu Valley. Preparations are made for the festival at Swayambhunath and Bouddhanath Stupas in advance. Monks and devotees perform various activities like dance to celebrate the festival.The festival is celebrated on the day of Lord Buddha, who was born in Lumbini. On the full moon day of Baisakh (approximately May), Buddha's birth, enlightenment and salvation are applauded both in and outside the Kathmandu Valley. Preparations are made for the festival at Swayambhunath and Bouddhanath Stupas in advance. Monks and devotees perform various activities like dance to celebrate the festival.


Generally, the festival falls in the month of December. Families having lost their members or relatives stay vigil at the Lord Shiva temple during the whole night, lighting oil lamps and singling songs. In Kathmandu, people throng the Pashupatinath temple. Having a ritual morning bath, they walk through the forest, scattering seven types of grain along the paths and over the Linga (Phallic symbol) of Lord Shiva to give merit to their kinsmen. It is also believed that scattering seven types of grain on this day would also cleanse the sins of Bala, a mythological man, who had been transformed into a demonGenerally, the festival falls in the month of December. Families having lost their members or relatives stay vigil at the Lord Shiva temple during the whole night, lighting oil lamps and singling songs. In Kathmandu, people throng the Pashupatinath temple. Having a ritual morning bath, they walk through the forest, scattering seven types of grain along the paths and over the Linga (Phallic symbol) of Lord Shiva to give merit to their kinsmen. It is also believed that scattering seven types of grain on this day would also cleanse the sins of Bala, a mythological man, who had been transformed into a demon


The festival is celebrated as the day of marriage of Ram, the hero of an epic Ramayana, and Sita, the daughter of King Janak. It is believed that King Janak had proposed a test of strength for the suitors of his daughter. The suitors had to string the great bow of Lord Shiva. Various warriors, kings and others had tried to lift the bow. But it was Ram who easily lifted the bow. When Ram tried to string the bow, it shattered into pieces. Then Ram and Sita were married in Janakpur.The festival is celebrated as the day of marriage of Ram, the hero of an epic Ramayana, and Sita, the daughter of King Janak. It is believed that King Janak had proposed a test of strength for the suitors of his daughter. The suitors had to string the great bow of Lord Shiva. Various warriors, kings and others had tried to lift the bow. But it was Ram who easily lifted the bow. When Ram tried to string the bow, it shattered into pieces. Then Ram and Sita were married in Janakpur.


December is the harvest season. Farmers prepare Yomari Punhi and offer it to the gods for providing abundant harvest. Yomari is a kind of special cake made from the flour of new rice. The cake is steamed with melted sugar and it is offered to the gods.December is the harvest season. Farmers prepare Yomari Punhi and offer it to the gods for providing abundant harvest. Yomari is a kind of special cake made from the flour of new rice. The cake is steamed with melted sugar and it is offered to the gods.


The festival is celebrated on the first day of the month of Magh (approximately January). As the sun enters the southern hemisphere in the holy month of Magh, days start becoming longer and warmer. People take a bath early in the morning and go to the temples of Lord Vishnu and offer flowers incense and food to Him. On this day, the Bhagawat Gita (Holy book of Hindus) is also read to please the gods.The festival is celebrated on the first day of the month of Magh (approximately January). As the sun enters the southern hemisphere in the holy month of Magh, days start becoming longer and warmer. People take a bath early in the morning and go to the temples of Lord Vishnu and offer flowers incense and food to Him. On this day, the Bhagawat Gita (Holy book of Hindus) is also read to please the gods.


The festival falls in the spring, the loveliest time of the year. Saraswati, the Goddess of learning, is worshipped at her temples in various parts of the country. In Kathmandu, People also throng the Nil Barahi shrine near Lazimpat. People from various walk of live, especially students and teachers, offer flowers, food items and other gifts to the Goddess Saraswati.The festival falls in the spring, the loveliest time of the year. Saraswati, the Goddess of learning, is worshipped at her temples in various parts of the country. In Kathmandu, People also throng the Nil Barahi shrine near Lazimpat. People from various walk of live, especially students and teachers, offer flowers, food items and other gifts to the Goddess Saraswati.


Various ethnic communities such as Sherpas, Tamangs and the people from the Tibetan origin celebrate the festival in February to welcome their New Year. Buddhist monks perform dances and offer prayers for good health and prosperity at monasteries. People exchange various goods and gifts among them. Buddhist families also host feasts and perform dances.Various ethnic communities such as Sherpas, Tamangs and the people from the Tibetan origin celebrate the festival in February to welcome their New Year. Buddhist monks perform dances and offer prayers for good health and prosperity at monasteries. People exchange various goods and gifts among them. Buddhist families also host feasts and perform dances.


The festival is marked every year during March-April. The festival is celebrated to praise the victory of the hero of the epic Ramayana over Rawan, an evil King of Lanka (Sri Lanka). It is believed that the Goddess Durga's power had helped Ram to achieve his victory. So, the Goddess Durga, the source of power, is also worshipped on the occasion.The festival is marked every year during March-April. The festival is celebrated to praise the victory of the hero of the epic Ramayana over Rawan, an evil King of Lanka (Sri Lanka). It is believed that the Goddess Durga's power had helped Ram to achieve his victory. So, the Goddess Durga, the source of power, is also worshipped on the occasion.


The festival is celebrated in the month of April. Outsiders often get amazed to see the fine horses of the Nepalese Army. Horse race competitions and other activities are organized at Tundikhel (Open Air Theatre).The festival is celebrated in the month of April. Outsiders often get amazed to see the fine horses of the Nepalese Army. Horse race competitions and other activities are organized at Tundikhel (Open Air Theatre).

It is said that the horse festival or Ghode Jatra began after the people of Kathmandu were able to bury a demon under the soil of Tundikhel. They say that the demon may rise again and cause trouble to the world if he is not trampled on each year. On the occasion, President of Nepal, Prime Minister and all top political leaders, dignitaries, top-level officials, the living Goddess Kumari and many others observe the festival.It is said that the horse festival or Ghode Jatra began after the people of Kathmandu were able to bury a demon under the soil of Tundikhel. They say that the demon may rise again and cause trouble to the world if he is not trampled on each year. On the occasion, President of Nepal, Prime Minister and all top political leaders, dignitaries, top-level officials, the living Goddess Kumari and many others observe the festival.


Generally, the festival falls in the month of August. Brahmins and Kshetris chant Gayatri mantra and change their sacred thread (Janai). In addition, both the Hindus and Buddhists tie a red or yellow thread around the wrist. It is believed that the thread can protect the people from evils. Devotees also visit Gosaikunda in Rasuwa district and Kumbheshwar temple in Patan.Generally, the festival falls in the month of August. Brahmins and Kshetris chant Gayatri mantra and change their sacred thread (Janai). In addition, both the Hindus and Buddhists tie a red or yellow thread around the wrist. It is believed that the thread can protect the people from evils. Devotees also visit Gosaikunda in Rasuwa district and Kumbheshwar temple in Patan.



This festival of cow is celebrated every year in August/September. This is one of the most popular festivals in Nepal (celebrated by Newar community) as it is full of humor, satire, comedy, mockery and shades of sadness too at the same time. And on this day satires and jokes on anybody is legal. As per the tradition, the family who has lost a relative during the past one year must take part in a procession by sending young boys in cow like attire and walk through the streets of Kathmandu. This festival also purges many who have lost their loved ones as they get to console themselves as to they are not the only ones who have been bereaved and it also teaches to accept death as a part of life.This festival of cow is celebrated every year in August/September. This is one of the most popular festivals in Nepal (celebrated by Newar community) as it is full of humor, satire, comedy, mockery and shades of sadness too at the same time. And on this day satires and jokes on anybody is legal. As per the tradition, the family who has lost a relative during the past one year must take part in a procession by sending young boys in cow like attire and walk through the streets of Kathmandu. This festival also purges many who have lost their loved ones as they get to console themselves as to they are not the only ones who have been bereaved and it also teaches to accept death as a part of life.


Mark your calendar on 28th August 2014 to witness all Nepalese Hindu women in 'Red' dancing and singing in typical Teej special folk tunes, gathered in streets, temples, all in holy and fasting mood. The festival is traditionally dedicated to the Goddess Parvati, remembering her union with Lord Shiva. It is a three-day-long celebration that combines splendid feasts as well as rigid fasting. Teej also welcomes and celebrates arrival of monsoon after a season of summer heat.
Teej is a festival celebrated by Nepali women for the long life of her husband and long and firm relationship between them until the death of this life and all the lives to come. Teej is observed for marital happiness, wellbeing of spouse and children and purification of own body and soul. The folk tunes all over, red and green outfits, ornaments, dances and happy faces of women here brings in tourists from all over to witness the celebration in here.The first day of the festival is called 'Dar khane Din' On this day all the family members especially the women, both married and unmarried gather at one place, in their finest outfits of red and start dancing and singing devotional songs mixed with Nepali folk and Dohori songs. This evening the grand feast takes place. The grand feast is called "Dar". The fun often goes on till midnight, after midnight the 24-hour fasting starts. Eating delicious food on the eve of Teej, and singing and dancing on the main day are the main features of this festival Second day is the main day of Teej (the fasting day). Some women take it very rigid, they even live without a piece of food and drops of water while some others take liquid and fruit. On this day married women happily dress in red, wear their lagan ko pote, nathhi, other jewelries and chadke tilahari ( jewelries are optional but chadke tilahari, laganko pote and natthi is said to be most important) and visit a nearby Lord Shiva's temple singing and dancing all the way. Most of devotees in Kathmandu go to Pashupatinath Temple. At the Shiva temple, women worship the Shiva lingam, the symbol of the lord Shiva, offering flowers, sweets and coins. The main puja (religious ceremony) takes place with offerings of flowers, fruits, etc., made to Shiva and Pārbati, pleading them to grant their blessing upon the husband and family. The most important part of the pooja is mostly done in the evening burning the oil lamp (108 sute batti in a diyo) which should be burning throughout the night. It is a tradition of giving the diyo of teej by her mother in law to the married woman. The third day morning, women get up early in the dawn and get cleaned and do the puja once again to the diyo and goddess Parvati. The most important part of this puja is a banana and holy basil (Tulsi patta) leaf. Only after this puja, women take solid food. This third day of Teej is Ganesh Chaturthati. Women eat Karkalo ko Tarkari with chokho (pure) food made with pure ghee. On the fourth day, after the completion of the previous day's pooja, women pay homage to various deities and bathe with red mud found on the roots of the sacred Datiwan bush, along with its leaves. This act of purification is the final ritual of Teej, after which women are considered forgiven from all their sins. The recent years have witnessed an adjustment in the rituals, especially regarding the strictness, but its spirit remains the same.
The actual date of inception of Teej is not known. However, it is celebrated by the women of Nepal and some part of India with lots of joy and enthusiasm. Most married women rich or poor observe this festival with fun. On this particular day, the streets of Kathmandu turn into a sea of red with women dressed in red Sarees and Dhoties making their way to Shiva shrines, especially to the Pashupatinath Temple.
On Teej, the devotees do not eat and drink the wh ole day. They first offer worship to Lord Shiva and spend the rest of the day singing and dancing in the temple premises. Singing Teej songs like "Teej ko rahar aayo bari lai". Indeed, women are seen mostly in holy sites on this day. Men are not allowed to enter the most of Shiva Temples on this day. Outside Kathmandu valley too, women gather in public places like roads and markets and enjoy the festival by singing and dancing. Though the women fast throughout the day - refusing to take even a drop of water.
Teej brings smiles on the faces of women in the cities and villages. It is a rare opportunity for any one to participate in this holy festival with the most melting hospitality of Nepalese people. We hope to see you here enjoying the festival with Nepalese people.


Indra Jatra is one of the most joyful and happening festivals of Kathmandu. It is a week-long festival worshipping living goddess Kumari of Kathmandu valley and Indra, king of all the gods in heaven. A large wooden pole is erected to symbolize the beginning of the Indra Jatra. The chariot of Kumari is pulled out through the old skirts of traditional Kathmandu. The elephant dance, the demon Lakhe dance and the Akash Bhairav sky dance are regularly demonstrated open in public throughout the festival. In the evening, lamps are lit in the name of the King god Indra. The homemade rice beer is distributed in public by the God keepers on the three days of chariot pulling. Every night at the courtyard of the Hanuman Dhoka Durbar Square, the group mask dance re - enacting the mother goddesses is performed in public. On the last day of the celebration, the tall wooden pole is pulled down to the ground and towed to the riverside to set in the fire hence marking the end of the festival.Indra Jatra is one of the most joyful and happening festivals of Kathmandu. It is a week-long festival worshipping living goddess Kumari of Kathmandu valley and Indra, king of all the gods in heaven. A large wooden pole is erected to symbolize the beginning of the Indra Jatra. The chariot of Kumari is pulled out through the old skirts of traditional Kathmandu. The elephant dance, the demon Lakhe dance and the Akash Bhairav sky dance are regularly demonstrated open in public throughout the festival. In the evening, lamps are lit in the name of the King god Indra. The homemade rice beer is distributed in public by the God keepers on the three days of chariot pulling. Every night at the courtyard of the Hanuman Dhoka Durbar Square, the group mask dance re - enacting the mother goddesses is performed in public. On the last day of the celebration, the tall wooden pole is pulled down to the ground and towed to the riverside to set in the fire hence marking the end of the festival.